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ICC- Literacy Comparing Exit Slips and RAFTs

For our November ICC- Literacy session, we are asking participants review statements regarding Exit Slips and RAFTs.  Some of the statements are true and some are false.  After some conversations with others at your table, please choose one statement and defend your answer.  Include evidence or examples to support your point of view.  In the comment section of this blog, include your name, email, and then in the larger text box,  your response to “defend your answer”.  When satisfied with your answer, please click on the submit button.  You comment will appear automatically.

37 Comments

  1. Amanda wrote:

    Statement #3

    I am certain this is a false statement because of the word “always” that is thrown in. RAFTs may or may not take 5 minutes to complete. It depends upon the student and the complexity of the role, audience, format, and the topic that he/she chose.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:39 am | Permalink
  2. Lisa wrote:

    Exit slips should not be graded. They are used to assess student understanding to aid the teacher addressing misconceptions.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:40 am | Permalink
  3. Sandra Hood wrote:

    I am wondering still about questions number 2 and 3. I don’t understand why the rigidity of the time frame for each. Or, does it really matter, less than five minutes for exit slips or more than five minutes for RAFTS.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:42 am | Permalink
  4. chaya wrote:

    9. An exit slip should always be high rigor.

    I put F+ for my symbol because Exit Slips can range in the level of rigor that they have. Sometimes you may need to see if the students are showing basic comprehension of the story line of their novel. This would be a lower level of rigor questioning. Other times they can/should be high rigor questioning so you can see the level that the students are at with their thinking. They have to have basic understanding before they can have higher levels of understanding and you as a teacher need to assess that.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:43 am | Permalink
  5. Arieux wrote:

    Statement #11: RAFTs should be graded on grammar, spelling, etc.; exit slips are not graded on these traits.

    I think this is absolutely false. The point of writing to learn is to display learning – facts, concepts. RAFTS are not about proper mechanics, they are to explore ideas and concepts from different perspectives. If something is to be graded on mechanics, it should be revised. Also, I think the point of writing to learn is to do it quickly, and explore connections, etc. If it’s graded on other elements, the student will focus less on that and more on the product.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:43 am | Permalink
  6. Rachel Hurley wrote:

    My group was concerned about #2 and #3. Should students be timed while completing exit slips or RAFTs? For many of us, the amount of time it took to our students to complete these write to learn activities differed from one activity to the next. Some of the writing prompts are more rigorous than others. We felt like putting a time limit on writing prompts might inhibit the students’ ability to respond thoroughly.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:44 am | Permalink
  7. Kelly wrote:

    I think statement #7 is false. Exit slips should not be thrown away after the teacher has read them because the teacher is supposed to clear up any misconceptions and address items of interest and humor the next day with students. In order to do this effectively, the slips should be kept to refer to when discussing with students.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:45 am | Permalink
  8. Barb wrote:

    Statement #3
    It takes more than 5 minutes to complete a raft. By the time the class brainstorms, records, discusses, researches, drafts, revises, edits, and publishes five minutes is impossible!

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:46 am | Permalink
  9. Amanda wrote:

    #3 I think that RAFTs can take less than 5 minutes because it depends on how you set them up. For instance I set up a RAFT where students did a text message of what a noun is to a 7th grade student. The actual write time took less than 5 minutes.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:46 am | Permalink
  10. MIchelle Keough wrote:

    I was unsure of the statement #6 RAFTS, unlike exit slips, can or cannot turn into a formal writing task.

    I defended the statement by saying that I often have my students write a clear concise summary (paragraph) over what they’ve learned for the day. This is an example of formal writing and also an exit slip.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:47 am | Permalink
  11. Brook wrote:

    I was under the impression that RAFTS were a longer type of “project” type assignment and an exit slip was a quick form of assessment. My first RAFT took 3 days for the kids to do! As I have learned more about Write to Learn I now understand that it depends upon the prompt used in the RAFT. The prompt will help determine how long it takes; it CAN take 5 mintutes for a RAFT if the prompt is of a lower-rigor and requires a simpler answer.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:47 am | Permalink
  12. Diane wrote:

    Statement #4 A teacher may respond to each exit slip and RAFT in writing, however I don’t think they should respond to each one. Why does it have to be in writing? If checking for understanding as a class they could be discarded after teacher review.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:48 am | Permalink
  13. JaDee Gloede wrote:

    I chose question #6 because I didn’t understand that an exit slip could be a formal writing assessment. After talking with my tablemates, they helped me to understand that any piece of writing could be taken through the formal writing process and clean it up. Therefore, this statement would be false.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:48 am | Permalink
  14. Stephanie wrote:

    #3-The components to RAFT are involved enough that it would be impossible to complete all 4 components well in less than 5 minutes, so I put T+

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:50 am | Permalink
  15. Kay Schmalen wrote:

    Depends on the purpose. Sometimes it may take 5 minutes, some less, some more. Research says the more time students are expected to write on a particular Write to Learn assignment the less effective.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 12:43 pm | Permalink
  16. Julie Blomme wrote:

    #1-Exit slips and RAFTs should always be graded(evaluated). I believe that they should never be graded. They are Write to Learn strategies that are a quick and dirt method to assess whether the kids are getting the concepts.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:48 am | Permalink
  17. Holly Main wrote:

    #1 Exit slips and RAFTs should always be graded. I believe that this statement is false. It depends on what the teacher wants to do with the material. The teacher has the flexility in the classroom to use the information as needed with the students.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:48 am | Permalink
  18. Donalyn Peter wrote:

    #1- Exit slips and RAFTS should not always be graded unless they are taken to the next step and are published. They are more of a quick assessment and they definitely should not always be graded. They do help with understanding though and are a good assessment of that.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:49 am | Permalink
  19. Carol Anne Follmuth wrote:

    #4 A teacher shouldn’t always respond because as we discussed earlier this morning, “simply by writing…you [the student] become aware of the connections you make, and you thereby know more than you knew before starting to write.” It could simply be for self-assessment or reflection, which wouldn’t require teacher response.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:49 am | Permalink
  20. DeeAnn Ewen wrote:

    #3 The outcome of RAFTS time length will be as different as your students. The desired purpose may be different too.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:50 am | Permalink
  21. #3: RAFTS always take more than 5 minutes for students to complete.

    I have used RAFTS with my 7th and 8th grade Reading classes. I only give my students the topic. I want them to use their creativity side and come up with their own RAF. I think this makes them more responsible for their RAFT and what they learned. Also, most of my students enjoy figuring that information out on their own. They like to be creative. I know there are some students who need my help coming up with ideas, but most of the time they choose and do a great job. I also have my students share with the class before they hand in their work so I can see it. Some students have made plays and loved sharing them. Other students enjoy getting ideas and other ways to think about the day’s lesson by seeing what other students come up with.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:50 am | Permalink
  22. #10 and #11
    All writing in my classes is expected to contain correct mechanics and conventions. The students are always reminded to watch for this, so there are no surprises. I defend this decision because I see there writing mechanics improving in all their writing. Students really do live up to teachers’ expectations.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:51 am | Permalink
  23. In response to #10, we have different opinions. I feel that in a RAFT or anything else where I am asking for creative and honest responses, I should not be looking at spelling and grammar. I need their view without limiting their thinking. I get more info. from them.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 11:53 am | Permalink
  24. Kendra Haugen wrote:

    In response to #1, I feel that there is a difference between evaluating an item and grading an item. I evaluate nearly every piece of work that I ask the students to complete. I feel that they give more effort if they know that I am going to “do” something with the item they have turned in. Even if I just give 5 completion points, their effort seems to be higher.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:24 pm | Permalink
  25. Nicole wrote:

    #1 I feel that sometimes the exit slips should be graded so that the students put more effort into the assignment and that way they know they are held accountable. I teach 11th grade and whenever I do informal assessments, one question I get asked is: Are you going to look at this? and Is it graded? If I say “no” every time, then it seems that translates to “okay, so, minimal effort, go through the motions because she won’t look at it anyway”

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:31 pm | Permalink
  26. Marcia DeVore wrote:

    #4

    Writing is a great way to individualize feedback, but it is not always the most practical and timely way to give feedback, especially with exit slips. I think exit slips are great for teachers to identify trends to address the next day in class. I like using index cards for exit slips because they are easy to sort into “trend” piles and I might try to pull one card to the top to read and encapsulate the trend and share my elaboration.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:32 pm | Permalink
  27. Diane wrote:

    In response to #4 a teacher does not need to respond in writing to every raft or exit slip. The teacher can do a quick check to evaluate the understanding and then the next day clear up any misconceptions that were stated on the exit slip. In regards to the raft, it can be the same way. This can also be used to have a discussion to allow students to decide the correctness or incorrectness of statements that were made. It then gives students a chance to be evaluative of the learning.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:33 pm | Permalink
  28. Shawn Miller wrote:

    #1 – Exit slips and rafts should never initially be graded. They are informal assessments designed to check for student understanding of the content of the material. They are not public or published; they are meant to provide feedback.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:34 pm | Permalink
  29. Jill Schutjer wrote:

    RAFTS always take more than 5 minutes for students to complete. I think this actually depends on the RAFT. A RAFT could have a very brief format – text, list – and you should be able to complete the RAFT in less time. I also think the word ALWAYS makes the question false.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:34 pm | Permalink
  30. Brooke Ploen wrote:

    #5

    Both RAFTs and exit slips are write to learn tasks. They are not graded and should take only a few minutes to complete. These tasks are formative assessments and help the teacher see what the students comprehend or what the students don’t understand.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:35 pm | Permalink
  31. Nicole wrote:

    @Carol Anne Follmuth
    I agree, kids need to have some freedom too, so they are comfortable to write their opinions and feelings without getting any feedback as so whether you think that is right or not

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:35 pm | Permalink
  32. Melanie Marreel wrote:

    RAFTs CAN be turned in to a formal writing task. I just used the “informal” RAFT from this class into one of our first semester’s formal Media Project. It was great collaborating with our Media Specialist, and it created a quality writing piece!

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:37 pm | Permalink
  33. Mary wrote:

    Mary Brinkman :
    #10 and #11
    All writing in my classes is expected to contain correct mechanics and conventions. The students are always reminded to watch for this, so there are no surprises. I defend this decision because I see their writing mechanics improving in all their writing. Students really do live up to teachers’ expectations.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:38 pm | Permalink
  34. Mary Giesking wrote:

    #4 – FALSE – A teacher should respond in writing to each exit slip and RAFT. The word “EACH” makes this false. I believe a teacher uses the exit slips to re-plan or redirect the next lesson. Feedback doesn’t need to be in writing.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:42 pm | Permalink
  35. Katrina Klooster wrote:

    @Brooke Ploen

    I agree that the two strategies, RAFTs and exit slips, should be quick and ungraded, but they both could move into more formal writing activities. If given more time, feedback, and guidelines these could be used as a more summative assessments.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:42 pm | Permalink
  36. Mary wrote:

    Mary :

    <a href="#comment-76" rel="nofollow"
    #10 and #11
    All writing in my classes is expected to contain correct mechanics and conventions. The students are always reminded to watch for this, so there are no surprises. I defend this decision because I see their writing mechanics improving in all their writing. Students really do live up to teachers’ expectations.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:52 pm | Permalink
  37. Mary wrote:

    #10 and #11
    All writing in my classes is expected to contain correct mechanics and conventions. The students are always reminded to watch for this, so there are no surprises. I defend this decision because I see their writing mechanics improving in all their writing. Students really do live up to teachers’ expectations.

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

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